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‘Saat Sainkada’ is a collection of seven hundred Dohas written by Karpur Chand Kulish. Through this, he has made a successful attempt to take the essence of the Vaidik religion, society etc. to the Dhoondhadi language speaking people. This book is a challenge to the so called Pundits who read and learn the same debased Suktas of the Veds and call themselves experts on the Veds. For us, not what is written in the Veds, but the meaning and messages given by the Veds is more important, which is the wealth of this book.

The first among all the Veds is the Rigved, which is considered to be the last word in case of any doubts in any sphere of life. It is said that whatever is in the Vedik Richas, is infallible. So, it would be proper to judge the importance of the ‘Saat Sainkada’ in perspective of the Last Word - the Rigved.

According to the Brihaspati Sukta of the Rigved (10.71.3), Kulish is one of those wise people, for whom it has been said, that those wise, gentle men started to walk on the path of knowledge in search of the meanings. They searched and located the mysterious knowledge and meanings hidden in the minds of the visionary sages, learned it thoroughly and established it in various forms. Our seven Pranas bow in respect to the same great and varied knowledge.

‘Saat Sainkada’ realistically depicts this knowledge. The Rigved accords equal importance to the spiritual as well as the material side of life. Because the commencement of progress begins from the material part, the same way as seed breaks and a sprout comes out only with properly tending to the soil. Thus, this world is not exactly incorporeal like a mirage.

The good of the Brahma is inherent in the good of this world. In the Rigved, the Rishis invoke the Gods repeatedly, requesting them to work continuously for the good of the world and protect them. ‘Saat Sainkada’ describes the same Vedic attitude, even more enthusiastically.

It is true that it the Brahma Who is the foundation of this material world. Kaushik Rishi says in the Rigved, "The world was created by Brahma." The same thing is explained by Kulish in Dhoondhadi language with great fluency.

The Veds are not in conformity with the Vedant definition that the Brahma is the truth, and the world is only delusory. If the Brahma is the ultimate truth, then the concept of the world being delusory is incorrect.

It is another matter that the Brahma has three forms - Srishta, Pravishta and Pravivikta. Being interdependent, all of these are proper.

The world, intertwined in the braids of the Three Virtues is like a coconut, the sound of which binds us.

The Param Brahma, Who has very long arms, sits without doing anything, alone. He is incongruous, indescribable and alone.

The Brahma with Maya, after living in the city, body or the universe, begins to be called ‘Purush’. The Brahma living outside the city is indescribable, Whom the Rishis describe in the Rigved, "Ekam Padam Notkhidati Hans Uchcharan."

Kulish understands from the Veds the proper meaning of Maya which was described as something bad in the post-Vedic Shastras. The Rigved says that Maya, having met Mitra and Varun (Pran and Apan), diffuses her aura of light in all directions. This is essentially a female.

Considering the inability of Brahma to perform the genesis of the universe, Maya came into being in the form of a "Yoshit", a woman.

The poet has purposefully used the word ‘Pargat’ here. Prajapatya Manu made offerings into the water, and the "Yoshit" was born after a year. If she had been born nine months later, she would have been called ‘daughter’. But this was Manu’s Maya, with whose assistance the universe was created. As such, Kulish calls her ‘Bhagwati’.

The word ‘Baath" also has been used purposefully. Maya is not the ‘treacherous lady’, but on the contrary, she is the image of the intellect and mind, that made the universe aware of the existence of Brahma, and then enveloped Him. She is the Tripur Sundari, or Bhagwati Mohini Maya, respected even by the Almighty.

By nature, the universe is full of conflict. Prajapati created gods and demons, and established the good and the bad. These two elements are a result of Prajapati’s contemplation. This is the science of nature, as well as knowledge.

It was as if a sacrifice of the poet’s feelings and passions in the burning Yajna of his intellectual energy was made. On completion of the Yajna, the ‘Saat Sainkada’ emerged, which is revealing the Vedic mysteries layer after layer. Every great activity is described as a Yajna, which has been going on eternally.

All know for a fact that joy is at the base of the universe. The Indian Puranas, religion, philosophy etc. interpret this in different ways, but Kulish looks at it from the viewpoint of the Veds.

In the Veds, ‘Anand’ or joy is derived from the verb ‘Nad’, which shows prosperity. In its complete form, it means the total prosperity that exists in each and every atom of the earth. This is the prosperity or ‘Anand’ which the poet is eager to experience.

Today, people who do not even understand the meaning of religion, call any sects or ways of worship as ‘Religion’. Out of ignorance and vain arrogance, Indians in the race of eulogizing their own sects look for the good of only a few, whereas the Veds seek the good of all the people living on earth.

Kulish says that to proceed on the path of religion, Yajna should be practiced rather than idol-worship. He has bitterly criticized those cowards who run away from duties and responsibilities.

This advice of the poet should be sufficient to induce Indians to work.

There are three great deities of the Rigved - Agni, Vayu, and Aditya. All other deities are parts of these three, who sustain the universe. The main deity of these three is Agni, the Fire God, Who remains existing even after the destruction in the form of Uchchishta Brahma, and causes the genesis of the next universe. As soon as the next universe is generated, He takes on a benevolent, gentle form and is called "Vaishwanar". This is the Deity that Kulish has accepted in the book. The God Vaishwanar exists in the kitchens of every household, and provides nourishment to people. Vashistha Rishi says in the Rigved (7.2.5), "First offering is being made to the Fire God Who resides in the stoves in the peoples’ households, Who is the Carrier Who carries everything to the other gods, and Who is the Guardian (Brahma)." The first roti or bread made on the stove is to be offered to the Fire God. In order that the Vaishwanar should not extinguish himself, the burning embers in the stove are covered with ash. Now the cooking gas has destroyed all these feelings and understandings, but this feeling still exists in village areas.

In the Rigved, Vaishwanar is treated as a bachelor, because He accepts the offerings made in each household, just as a bachelor does.

Thus, the bachelor and Vaishwanar are both very common.

In the present times, due to casteism, roots of the tree of the society have become very weak., and it may get destroyed any time because of the defects that have developed in it. Greatly disturbed and moved with this feeling, the poet wants to draw the attention of the society towards the Vedic social system.

This means that caste is decided on the basis of the nature of one’s duties, and the Varna is decided by birth. In the Rigved, Varna means ‘nature of the individual’. Thus, based on the stars at the time of birth, even a Brahmin can be a Shudra or low caste. According to the Vedic Varna system, the concept of untouchability does not exist.

It is the social system that is defective, and these defects can be removed.

In the Rigved, the Rishis instruct, "Fellow men! Bring equality and coordination in the mind, your utterances and your duties, so that you can live peacefully and happily." If we want to establish moral and ethical values in the society, then we must follow the Vedic Rishis’ instructions. Kulish asks, why are those who have the Vedic wealth still confused?

The Rigvedic Rishi says, "Wasted is his life who does not befriend the Veds that uproot communal feelings, inequalities and social defects. His participation in the universe of knowledge is in vain."

Kulish’s Dhoohdhadi Dohas are full of nationalism, self respect and the sense of social good, which is exactly what the Vedic Rishis desire.

In a nation where the Rishis and sages made human life a true joy by purifying the social, political and natural environment by performing Yajnas, contemplation, and good deeds, now treacherous leaders, sadhus, mahants, religious leaders, the wealthy, the administrators etc. are destroying the very roots of the nation by creating and diffusing the most undesirable feelings. These people are making a mockery of the Vedic culture and, dividing the society into sects and groups, they are going on the path of violence. The poet’s sensitive mind is disturbed when he senses the intellectual and moral downslide of the Indians. He bitterly criticizes the anti-social elements. He says to these ignorant people who have lost the support of the Veds in the style of Kabir, the great medieval saint-poet, "_______"

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 Title : SAAT SAINKADA IN PERSPECTIVE OF RIGVED Author : Smt Urmila Devi Sharma

 

‘Saat Sainkada’ is a collection of seven hundred Dohas written by Karpur Chand Kulish. Through this, he has made a successful attempt to take the essence of the Vaidik religion, society etc. to the Dhoondhadi language speaking people. This book is a challenge to the so called Pundits who read and learn the same debased Suktas of the Veds and call themselves experts on the Veds. For us, not what is written in the Veds, but the meaning and messages given by the Veds is more important, which is the wealth of this book.

The first among all the Veds is the Rigved, which is considered to be the last word in case of any doubts in any sphere of life. It is said that whatever is in the Vedik Richas, is infallible. So, it would be proper to judge the importance of the ‘Saat Sainkada’ in perspective of the Last Word - the Rigved.

According to the Brihaspati Sukta of the Rigved (10.71.3), Kulish is one of those wise people, for whom it has been said, that those wise, gentle men started to walk on the path of knowledge in search of the meanings. They searched and located the mysterious knowledge and meanings hidden in the minds of the visionary sages, learned it thoroughly and established it in various forms. Our seven Pranas bow in respect to the same great and varied knowledge.

‘Saat Sainkada’ realistically depicts this knowledge. The Rigved accords equal importance to the spiritual as well as the material side of life. Because the commencement of progress begins from the material part, the same way as seed breaks and a sprout comes out only with properly tending to the soil. Thus, this world is not exactly incorporeal like a mirage.

The good of the Brahma is inherent in the good of this world. In the Rigved, the Rishis invoke the Gods repeatedly, requesting them to work continuously for the good of the world and protect them. ‘Saat Sainkada’ describes the same Vedic attitude, even more enthusiastically.

It is true that it the Brahma Who is the foundation of this material world. Kaushik Rishi says in the Rigved, "The world was created by Brahma." The same thing is explained by Kulish in Dhoondhadi language with great fluency.

The Veds are not in conformity with the Vedant definition that the Brahma is the truth, and the world is only delusory. If the Brahma is the ultimate truth, then the concept of the world being delusory is incorrect.

It is another matter that the Brahma has three forms - Srishta, Pravishta and Pravivikta. Being interdependent, all of these are proper.

The world, intertwined in the braids of the Three Virtues is like a coconut, the sound of which binds us.

The Param Brahma, Who has very long arms, sits without doing anything, alone. He is incongruous, indescribable and alone.

The Brahma with Maya, after living in the city, body or the universe, begins to be called ‘Purush’. The Brahma living outside the city is indescribable, Whom the Rishis describe in the Rigved, "Ekam Padam Notkhidati Hans Uchcharan."

Kulish understands from the Veds the proper meaning of Maya which was described as something bad in the post-Vedic Shastras. The Rigved says that Maya, having met Mitra and Varun (Pran and Apan), diffuses her aura of light in all directions. This is essentially a female.

Considering the inability of Brahma to perform the genesis of the universe, Maya came into being in the form of a "Yoshit", a woman.

The poet has purposefully used the word ‘Pargat’ here. Prajapatya Manu made offerings into the water, and the "Yoshit" was born after a year. If she had been born nine months later, she would have been called ‘daughter’. But this was Manu’s Maya, with whose assistance the universe was created. As such, Kulish calls her ‘Bhagwati’.

The word ‘Baath" also has been used purposefully. Maya is not the ‘treacherous lady’, but on the contrary, she is the image of the intellect and mind, that made the universe aware of the existence of Brahma, and then enveloped Him. She is the Tripur Sundari, or Bhagwati Mohini Maya, respected even by the Almighty.

By nature, the universe is full of conflict. Prajapati created gods and demons, and established the good and the bad. These two elements are a result of Prajapati’s contemplation. This is the science of nature, as well as knowledge.

It was as if a sacrifice of the poet’s feelings and passions in the burning Yajna of his intellectual energy was made. On completion of the Yajna, the ‘Saat Sainkada’ emerged, which is revealing the Vedic mysteries layer after layer. Every great activity is described as a Yajna, which has been going on eternally.

All know for a fact that joy is at the base of the universe. The Indian Puranas, religion, philosophy etc. interpret this in different ways, but Kulish looks at it from the viewpoint of the Veds.

In the Veds, ‘Anand’ or joy is derived from the verb ‘Nad’, which shows prosperity. In its complete form, it means the total prosperity that exists in each and every atom of the earth. This is the prosperity or ‘Anand’ which the poet is eager to experience.

Today, people who do not even understand the meaning of religion, call any sects or ways of worship as ‘Religion’. Out of ignorance and vain arrogance, Indians in the race of eulogizing their own sects look for the good of only a few, whereas the Veds seek the good of all the people living on earth.

Kulish says that to proceed on the path of religion, Yajna should be practiced rather than idol-worship. He has bitterly criticized those cowards who run away from duties and responsibilities.

This advice of the poet should be sufficient to induce Indians to work.

There are three great deities of the Rigved - Agni, Vayu, and Aditya. All other deities are parts of these three, who sustain the universe. The main deity of these three is Agni, the Fire God, Who remains existing even after the destruction in the form of Uchchishta Brahma, and causes the genesis of the next universe. As soon as the next universe is generated, He takes on a benevolent, gentle form and is called "Vaishwanar". This is the Deity that Kulish has accepted in the book. The God Vaishwanar exists in the kitchens of every household, and provides nourishment to people. Vashistha Rishi says in the Rigved (7.2.5), "First offering is being made to the Fire God Who resides in the stoves in the peoples’ households, Who is the Carrier Who carries everything to the other gods, and Who is the Guardian (Brahma)." The first roti or bread made on the stove is to be offered to the Fire God. In order that the Vaishwanar should not extinguish himself, the burning embers in the stove are covered with ash. Now the cooking gas has destroyed all these feelings and understandings, but this feeling still exists in village areas.

In the Rigved, Vaishwanar is treated as a bachelor, because He accepts the offerings made in each household, just as a bachelor does.

Thus, the bachelor and Vaishwanar are both very common.

In the present times, due to casteism, roots of the tree of the society have become very weak., and it may get destroyed any time because of the defects that have developed in it. Greatly disturbed and moved with this feeling, the poet wants to draw the attention of the society towards the Vedic social system.

This means that caste is decided on the basis of the nature of one’s duties, and the Varna is decided by birth. In the Rigved, Varna means ‘nature of the individual’. Thus, based on the stars at the time of birth, even a Brahmin can be a Shudra or low caste. According to the Vedic Varna system, the concept of untouchability does not exist.

It is the social system that is defective, and these defects can be removed.

In the Rigved, the Rishis instruct, "Fellow men! Bring equality and coordination in the mind, your utterances and your duties, so that you can live peacefully and happily." If we want to establish moral and ethical values in the society, then we must follow the Vedic Rishis’ instructions. Kulish asks, why are those who have the Vedic wealth still confused?

The Rigvedic Rishi says, "Wasted is his life who does not befriend the Veds that uproot communal feelings, inequalities and social defects. His participation in the universe of knowledge is in vain."

Kulish’s Dhoohdhadi Dohas are full of nationalism, self respect and the sense of social good, which is exactly what the Vedic Rishis desire.

In a nation where the Rishis and sages made human life a true joy by purifying the social, political and natural environment by performing Yajnas, contemplation, and good deeds, now treacherous leaders, sadhus, mahants, religious leaders, the wealthy, the administrators etc. are destroying the very roots of the nation by creating and diffusing the most undesirable feelings. These people are making a mockery of the Vedic culture and, dividing the society into sects and groups, they are going on the path of violence. The poet’s sensitive mind is disturbed when he senses the intellectual and moral downslide of the Indians. He bitterly criticizes the anti-social elements. He says to these ignorant people who have lost the support of the Veds in the style of Kabir, the great medieval saint-poet, "_______"

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